3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans
3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans
3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans
3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans
3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans
3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans
3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans
3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans

3rd Grade Guided Reading Lesson Plans

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A YEAR OF GUIDED READING LESSON PLANS for 3RD GRADE!

Over 540 Pages of Lesson Plans, Anecdotal Records Sheets, Vocabulary Pages and Graphic Organizers!

This product includes 34 weeks of Guided Reading Lesson Plans for the teacher and activities for the students! (All you have to do is choose your book!)

17 CCSS Aligned and 19 TEKS Aligned Skills are broken down into 9 day segments of lessons equaling 34 weeks!

WITHIN EACH LESSON:
• A CCSS Skills (or TEKS Skills) Binder Divider Page
• A brief vocabulary table activity do begin your small group lesson. You choose the words from the book you are using for your lesson. 
• A “Before Reading” mini lesson and book talk.
• “During Reading” questions stems.
• “After Reading” assessment or wrap up activity.
• Vocabulary Dice Task Sheet
• Anecdotal Record Form to fill out on students.

THESE ARE GREAT PRINT AND GO LESSONS AND RESOURCES TO PUT IN A BINDER!

Skills Included: (Informational and Literature)

RI. 3.1 Students will ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for answers.

RI. 3.2 Students will be able to determine the main idea of the text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

RI. 3.3 Students will be able to describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

RI. 3.4 Students will be able to determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.

RI. 3.5 Students will be able to use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

RI. 3.6 Students will be able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

RI. 3.7 Students will be able to use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

RI. 3.8 Students will be able to describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).

RI. 3.9 Students will be able to compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

RL. 3.1 Students will ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for answers.

RL. 3.2 Students will recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

RL. 3.3 Students will describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feels) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

RL. 3.4 Students will determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from non-literal language.

RL. 3.5 Students will be able to refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

RL. 3.6 Students will be able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

RL. 3.7 The students will explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustration contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of character or setting.)

RL. 3.8 (not applicable with literature)

RL. 3.9 Students will be able to compare and contrast the themes, settings and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series.)

TEKS

(3.2) Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:
(A) use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues) to make and confirm predictions;
(B) ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; 

(3.4) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. 

(3.5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories; and
(B) compare and contrast the settings in myths and traditional folktales.

(3.6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the characteristics of various forms of poetry and how they create imagery (e.g., narrative poetry, lyrical poetry, humorous poetry, free verse)

(3.7) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the elements of plot and character as presented through dialogue in scripts that are read, viewed, written, or performed.

(3.8) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) sequence and summarize the plot's main events and explain their influence on future events;
(B) describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and
(C) identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.

(3.9) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference in point of view between a biography and autobiography.

(3.10) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify language that creates a graphic visual experience and appeals to the senses.

(3.12) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the topic and locate the author's stated purposes in writing the text.

(3.13) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) identify the details or facts that support the main idea;
(C) identify explicit cause and effect relationships among ideas in texts; and
(D) use text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics) to locate information and make and verify predictions about contents of text.

(3.14) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to identify what the author is trying to persuade the reader to think or do.

(3.15) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:
(A) follow and explain a set of written multi-step directions; and
(B) locate and use specific information in graphic features of text.

(3.16) Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
(A) understand how communication changes when moving from one genre of media to another;
(B) explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., shape, color, sound); and
(C) compare various written conventions used for digital media (e.g., language in an informal e-mail vs. language in a web-based news article).

FIG. 19 D and E are embedded in many of the other lessons. I did not do different lessons for these because they should be part of every lesson while students are reading. 

THIS ITEM IS A MUST HAVE! I have taught reading for 6 years and have my Master’s as a Reading Specialist. These are skill based lesson plans, with instructions for the teacher and fun, interactive yet challenging activities for the student! 


If you still have questions, message me or e-mail me at Hillary3986@gmail.com!